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Monday, July 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of The political economy of Australian bilateral aid allocations found in the catalog.

The political economy of Australian bilateral aid allocations

Mark McGillivray

The political economy of Australian bilateral aid allocations

by Mark McGillivray

  • 11 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by School of Economics, La Trobe University in Bundoora, Vic., Australia .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Developing countries.
    • Subjects:
    • Economic assistance, Australian -- Developing countries.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementMark McGillivray.
      SeriesDiscussion papers ;, no. 4/85, Economics discussion papers (Melbourne, Vic.) ;, no. 85/4.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHC60 .M3622 1985
      The Physical Object
      Pagination80 p. ;
      Number of Pages80
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2656627M
      ISBN 100858166402
      LC Control Number85241033

        Bilateral aid occurs when one government directly transfers money or other assets to a recipient country. On the surface, American bilateral aid programs are designed to spread economic . The paper uses quantitative and qualitative analysis to explore patterns of aid allocation, both across countries and sectors, and examines the dynamics of aid relationships in three case study countries in order to shed light on the mechanisms used by donors to promote their development agendas.

      This eight-chapter book provides information on Official Development Assistance (ODA), its importance in relation to developed and developing countries, and its prospects and limitations. Major areas discussed include: (1) the institutional evolution of development aid; (2) forms of ODA, including project aid, program aid, bilateral aid, multilateral aid, technical assistance, food aid, and. Bruce Bueno de Mesquita and Alastair Smith (), ‘A Political Economy of Aid’ Miroslav Nincic (), ‘Getting What You Want: Positive Inducements in International Relations’ PART II AID AND DONORS R.D. McKinlay and R. Little (), ‘A Foreign-Policy Model of the Distribution of British Bilateral Aid, –70’

      bilateral aid flows to Africa in the s from the United States, Japan, France and Sweden and conclude that economic and military factors often play a role in determining aid flows. Berthelemy and Tichit () examine bilateral aid in the s and s and find that former colonies and trade partners are rewarded with more aid. Bilateral Aid ; Multilateral Aid (through the World Bank or UN development programs) 7 The Determinants of China s Aid Allocation Axel Dreher (University of Heidelberg) Andreas Fuchs The Economics of Foreign Aid Lecture 2 Political Economy of Aid - Collier & Dollar () compute a 'poverty efficient aid.


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The political economy of Australian bilateral aid allocations by Mark McGillivray Download PDF EPUB FB2

This paper examines the political economy of aid allocation first from the perspective of the donor country, and then the political economy of aid receipt and implementation from the perspective of the recipient country.

When helpful, it draws from studies of multilateral aid. This book goes on to propose a theory, which the authors term ‘structural political economy analysis’ (SPEA), that they believe will better assist policy-makers and practitioners of overseas aid programs (aid programs as distinctly different from development, which is viewed in SPEA as an historical outcome of many contests and negotiations.

This paper focuses on the allocation of Australian bilateral aid to developing countries. It simultaneously models the determination of potential recipients' eligibility for Australian aid and the Cited by: An examination of Australian bilateral aid allocations.

The Japanese government has pledged to use foreign aid to promote economic development and political stability in developing : Mark Mcgillivray. Donors also appear to be more concerned about alleviating physical miseries (infant mortality) and rewarding good human rights conditions, but less towards reducing economic hardships (poverty).

Moreover, the usual political and strategic considerations of donors continue to be the major determinants of aid allocation even in the Post Cold War by: Together these factors determine the allocation and use of aid.i In considering the causes of aid, and reflecting on what causal conditions support foreign aid, political economy perspectives are useful.

A political economy perspective treats aid as a policy action of donors, to be explained by political and economic goals. Bilateral foreign aid: How important is aid effectiveness to people for choosing countries to determine bilateral aid allocations.

Though we are interested in a different research question – Analysing the responses of both Australian citizens and the Australian government to natural disasters overseas, Feeny and Clarke () finds.

The first in the five-volume series was published inedited by E.L. ‘Ted’ Wheelwright along with Ken Buckley, and the final edition was published in The ambition was to focus on the historical development and contemporary growth of capitalism in Australia from the standpoint of historical materialism.

For United States, political and strategic concerns appear to be stronger than economic gains from aid allocation. 28 Moreover, individual donor countries, in order to maintain their influence, appear to provide larger amount of aid to a recipient receiving more aid from other bilateral donor countries and/or multilateral agencies.

Canada. Lessons on Foreign Aid and Economic Development Micro and Macro Perspectives. foreign aid flows economic development developing countries bilateral economic assistance bilateral donor nations taxation state capacity hypothesis aid agencies aid strategies donor motivation Independent Evaluation Group World Bank health aid political economy.

3 We have explicitly tested a humanitarian model of U.S. aid allocation. The model consists of the variables of per capita gross domestic product (G.D.P.) measuring the level of relative assistance, and two sets of variables measuring welfare needs (per capita G.D.P., per capita calorie consumption, and number of doctors perpopulation), and economic performance (size of international.

Although some studies have compared the aid allocation practices of bilateral vs multilateral aid donors to evaluate how they perform against various criteria (Easterly and Pfutze, ; Hashmi et al., ; OECD, ; OECD/UNDP, ), few studies have empirically examined if and how differences in the practices of bilateral vs multilateral.

Downloadable (with restrictions). Rooted in the Paris Declaration on Aid effectiveness, contemporary discourses on bilateral aid emphasize partnership, coordination, and allocation of aid according to recipients’ need. While aid to education is a key theme in literature on education for international development, systematic studies of aid flows in the education sector are very rare.

1 Bilateral Economic Relations in a Global Political Economy: Australia and Japan Mark Beeson∗ Abstract: This paper argues that despite the internationalisation of economic activity, and a concomitant diminution of economic policy-making autonomy, national policy settings continue to.

This paper evaluates whether the “trade, not aid” logic has driven bilateral aid allocations in practice.

Using a dataset that covers development assistance from 22 donor countries to aid recipients from towe find that donor countries have dispersed bilateral aid in ways that reinforce their extant bilateral commercial ties. CHOMSKY, N. and HERMAN, E.

() The Political Economy of Human Rights: Washington Connection and Third World Fascism (Boston: South End Press). Google Scholar CINGRANELLI, D. and PASQUARELLO, T. () ‘Human Rights Practices and the Distribution of U.S.

Foreign Aid to Latin American Countries’, American Journal of Political Science. Furthermore, based on findings that have emerged from interviews with over respondents, including government officials, representatives of donor aid agencies, the private sector, civil society organizations and primary beneficiaries of US-funded projects, this book offers significant insights to researchers, policy-makers and practitioners.

The majority of countries around the world are engaged in the foreign aid process, as donors, recipients, or, oftentimes, both. States use foreign aid as a means of pursuing foreign policy objectives. Aid can be withdrawn to create economic hardship or to destabilize an unfriendly or ideologically antagonistic regime.

Or, conversely, aid can be provided to bolster and reward a friendly. " Socio-political instability and the allocation of international aid by donors," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol.

19(1), pagesMarch. Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS) More about this item. The paper examines the main characteristics of the (re)emerging foreign aid policies of the Visegrád countries (the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia), concentrating on the allocation of their aid resources.

We adopt an econometric approach, similar to the ones used in the literature for analyzing the aid allocation of the OECD DAC donors. This paper will provide a brief analytical overview of the current political-economy of South Africa. It begins with an “In Brief” section: a snapshot of political institutions and social and economic indicators before addressing macro-economic.HAYTER T ().

Aid as Imperialism. London, Penguin Books. HOPF T (). The Promise of Constructivism in International Relations. International Security 23(1) ISOPI A, MAVROTAS G ().

Aid allocation and aid effectiveness. An empirical analysis.Chapters 1 and 3 consider the allocation of official development assistance across different aid channels (bilateral, multi-bi/trust funds, or multilateral).

Chapter 2 studies the sub-annual.